A bouquet En Plein-Air

Karl Albert Buehr - The Parasol
Karl Albert Buehr – The Parasol

Karl Albert Beuher was one of the early Chicago painters to adopt Impressionism. He joined other American artists in Giverny, France, to paint en plein-air in the commune established by Claude Monet. These impressionists developed a style that required quickness in order to finish a piece before the sun moved and the light changed. They wanted to capture their subjects, which were generally natural scenes, as the eye might see them. Instead of hard lines and lots of detail, Bueher’s brush delivered bursts of color and light that seem to illustrate a fleeting moment in time. He wants us to see ripples in the leaves instead of the angles in the bark. He wants us to see a sea of long grasses and field flowers instead of individual blades of grass and carefully represented blooms.

The art of floral arrangement is as varied as any art form. Last week, we showed you our Georgia O’Keefe inspired arrangements and how color and line can be used to suggest energy and emotions. This week we’re looking at another bouquet – this one designed on the same principles as Bueher’s  early works.

Wedding bouquets

We’re focusing on the impression of these flowers as a whole, instead of on any one individual “wow” flower.  There is a lightness represented in Beuher’s work that we wanted to capture. In regards to the design above, we wanted to create something genuine, unfettered, and at one with the scene. Something that would be memorable for the occasion, but serve to enhance the impression of the overall, rather than draw attention to itself.

Take a look at Beuher’s painting below and the flowers we selected to make up this arrangement. For our “plein-air” bouquet, we want to create a light and feathery texture similar to that of Beuher’s brush strokes. The vibrance of the colors in the artwork are also important. We love how shadows are created with vibrant shades of green and the pink – they create contrast we might describe as “lightness” instead of “brightness”.

 

Flowers used in bouquet

 

Each flower was carefully selected for it’s size, color, and texture. Our wind-swept bouquet of wildflowers is purely fantastical – few of these flowers are native to any one common region. Luckily, here at Starbright, we had no problem getting the flowers we wanted. Our selection included :
1/ Dusty Miller – The quaint name isn’t the only thing we love about this hardy foliage. With it’s silver-white color and soft texture, this leaf adds a wistful element to any arrangement.
2/ Stock – Noted for it’s heady, clove-like scent. This example of the variety, with double flowers, adds texture to our arrangement. Stock also is a symbol of a happy life and a contented existence.
3/ Astilbe – These remind us of wildflowers. The feathery stalks seem to float in this arrangement.
4/ Lisianthus – Native to equatorial areas of the American continents. This delicate, long-lasting, prairie flower has ruffled petals. They represent warmth and geniality.
5/ Dahlia – Sometimes called the “Queen of the Autumn Garden”, the dahlia belongs to the Asteraceae family which is noted for their star-shaped blooms and includes flowers lie the daisy and sunflower. Traditionally these flowers symbolize hope for an everlasting union.
6/ Freesia – Sweetly, citrus-scented and long-lasting, these graceful flowers are perfect for a bouquet. Each wiry stem can have up to 10 flowers.
7/ Ranunculus – The fine layers of petals give this weighty flower a delicate appearance.
8/ Muscari – Small and fragrant, the shape of these flowers is reminiscent of little bells.


Starbright Logo

 

Looking for flowers in New York City? Visit our Event Gallery for inspiration. Or see our daily selection at Starbrightnyc.com.

November Birth Flower: Chrysanthemums, flower with an identity crisis…

Chrysanthemums were first cultivated in China as a flowering herb in the 15th Century BC.  The flower was brought to Japan in the 8th Century and the Emperor adopted the flower as his official seal.  The flower was brought to Europe in the 17th Century and named from the Greek for “Gold Flower”, a reflection of its original color.

The Chrysanthemum - November Flower....

These days the flowers come in various forms and can be daisy-like, decorative pompons, or buttons.  In addition to the traditional yellow, other colors are available such as white, purple and red.

In the United States, Chrysanthemums are identified as cheerful holiday flowers.  Fall arrangements and Thanksgiving Day Flowers in NYC and throughout the country incorporate Chrysanthemums in their decor.  However, many European countries (France, Italy, Spain, Hungary and Croatia) have identified Chrysanthemums with death.  Accordingly, their use in floral arrangements is limited to funerals or on graves.

Other Uses:

Be sure to bring Chrysanthemums with you when taking a walk in the jungle.  The flower is considered a natural source as an insect repellent.  The Pyrethins when extracted and applied on the skin in an oil suspension or as a powder can be lethal to insects such as mosquitoes.  The Chinese have used the flower for its antiseptic and antibiotic qualities for centuries.

Starbright Floral Design is located  in the heart of New York City’s Historic Flower District.  We are in a second floor loft space from where our customer’s orders get dispatched.  To learn more about our organization and the work that we do, we would like to invite you to visit our website at www.starflor.com or you may call us at 800.520.8999.  Either way, we would be thrilled to hear from you and to be of service.

Starbright deliverers flowers in Manhattan (our home city) as well as world-wide.  In addition to flowers and plants, fruit and gourmet baskets, balloon and the like; we are also the go-to florist for events (both corporate and personal).  Flowers, Festivals & Celebrations…. It is what we do!

Wishing you a wonderful day!

 

Starbright Floral Design

“The Official Florist of the City that Never Sleeps”

website: starflor.com

to order flowers: www.starbrightnyc.com

by phone: 800.520.8999

Remembering: Our Grandparents

“To forget one’s ancestors is to be a brook without a source, a tree without a root.” Chinese Proverb.

National Grandparents Day is a national holiday celebrated the first Sunday of September after Labor Day of each year.  This year the holiday falls on September 11.

The holiday was created by former President Jimmy Carter by proclamation in 1978 (believed by many to be his greatest; some would say only; accomplishment as president). The statute cites the day’s purpose as: “…to honor grandparents, to give grandparents an opportunity to show love for their children’s children, and to help children become aware of strength, information, and guidance older people can offer”.

Grandparents are a family’s greatest treasure.  They are the defenders of our family traditions.  They are the foundation upon which a strong family structure is built.  They provide a special kind of love that sets them apart.   Grandparents have the ability convey knowledge while providing a seeming endless supply of cookies.  However, despite their wisdom, some answers still elude them.  For example, my mother told me that one of life’s greatest mysteries was how the girl who wasn’t good enough to marry her wonderful son (my wife) can be the mother of the smartest grandchild (my son) in the world.  I guess my gene pool won out.

The official flower of the U.S. National Grandparents Day is the forget-me-not.  Interestingly, forget about giving the official flower as a gift on Grandparents day, it blooms in the spring and is not available.  Accordingly, seasonal flowers are typically given in appreciation to grandparents.

Happy Grandparents Day to all!

This scribe is brought to you by all of us at Starbright Floral Design.  The Official Florist of the City that Never Sleeps.  Flowers, Festivals and  Celebrations… It is what we do!

To visit our website: http://starflor.com/

Our E-Commerce Portal: http://www.starbrightnyc.com/ (to send flowers in New York City or worldwide)

Our number is 800.520.8999 – we look forward to hearing from you and maybe meeting you one day soon!

August Birth Flower: Gladiolus (U.S.) or Poppy (U.K.)

Gladiolus

Gladiolus has been dubbed the flower of the Gladiators.   It represents strength of character, sincerity, generosity.  In the Victorian age with its secret language of flowers it was said to represent “love at first sight”. Gladiolus derives its name from the latin word for sword and is sometimes called the sword lily.  As a member of the iris family it contains about 260 species.   Only about 10 are native to Europe the rest are native to southern Africa.  The species vary from very small to the spectacular giant flower spikes you see in floral designs. The flower stalk of the Gladiolus contains an extended row of trumpet-shaped, fragrant flowers, all of which face in one direction. Their colors include pink to reddish or light purple with white, contrasting markings, or white to cream or orange to red.

 

Poppy

All species of poppies are attractive and most are cultivated as ornamental plants.   In Europe the poppy is a common weed and found in many locales including Flanders, the setting for the famous poem by the Canadian surgeon and soldier John McCrae “In Flanders Fields”.  However, A few species are cultivated as sources of drugs and foods. The opium poppy is so widely used, for both drugs and food, that its worldwide production is monitored by international agencies. It produces opium, opiates, poppy seeds and poppy seed oil.

Poppies have long been used as a symbol of both sleep and death.  Sleep because of the opium extracted from them, and death because of the common blood-red color of the red poppy.  In Greek and Roman myths, poppies were used as offerings to the dead.  Poppies used as emblems on tombstones symbolize eternal sleep.

In the United Kingdom poppies are traditionally worn on lapels each November in remembrance of those who died serving their country (symbol coming from Flanders Field).  In November 2010 the U.K.’s prime minister and his aides wore the poppies on their lapels during a visit to China nearly causing an international incident and damaging relations between the two countries.  The Chinese took offense because the poppy reminds the Chinese of the many Chinese who died at the hands of the English during the Opium wars fought in the 1800’s.  The Chinese insisted the Poppies be removed.  The Prime Minister informed the Chinese that poppies meant a great deal to them and the English people and refused to remove them.

Artificial poppies (called “Buddy Poppies”) are used by the Veterans of Foreign Wars as a source of financial assistance to disabled veterans who assemble them.  VFW conducted its first poppy distribution before Memorial Day in 1922, becoming the first veterans’ organization to organize a nationwide distribution. The poppy soon was adopted as the official memorial flower of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. Today, VFW Buddy Poppies are still assembled by disabled and needy veterans in VA Hospitals.   The minimal cost of Buddy Poppies to VFW units provides compensation to the veterans who assemble the poppies, provides financial assistance in maintaining state and national veterans’ rehabilitation and service programs and partially supports the VFW National Home for orphans and widows of our nation’s veterans.

This scribe is brought to you by your friends at Starbright Floral Design… We are an enthusiastic bunch that spends our day making really cool compositions of flowers. Bright colors,  great designs and  amazing service to our clients is what we are all about.  Starbright is located in the heart of New York City’s Historic Flower District in a second floor loft space.  We spend our days making flower arrangements that we send as gifts on behalf of our clients.  People call us for a bunch of reasons (1 800 520 8999)… Sometimes to say “sorry”, other times to wish someone well during an illness or to congratulate on one of life’s major milestones.  Sometimes people call us because the caught the romantic influenza and they think someone is super sexy! We even get some really shy customers that don’t know what to say on  the card and need lots of help!

For world-wide delivery of flowers, be sure  to visit our website at www.starflor.com.  We would love to hear from you!

To place  an order for amazing flowers online go to:  www.starbrightnyc.com

Our warmest regards,

 

The Official Florist of the City that Never Sleeps

Starbright Floral Design, 150 West 28th Street, New York City.

We are on the SECOND floor!

1 800 520  8999

www.starflor.com

 

 

Our Work: Our Latest in Floral Compositions

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Check out the photos in this album they are the latest additions to our website in our Event Gallery.  We invite you to visit our site at www.starflor.com where you can click on  the EVENT link to see our entire portfolio of over 2000 photos of our actual work.

By clicking on the GIFTS link you will go to our e-commerce portal where you can select from a wide array of gifts to send to your friends and loved ones.  Some of the flower selections that are in our gift section  are available for delivery on a national level, while others (Starbright Exclusives – Modern and Starbright Exclusives – Traditional) are available in our own delivery area of Manhattan.  Looking for something but cannot decide what flowers to send?  Designer’s Choice is a great alternative!  Here is a link to a past blog entry that talks about why Designer’s Choice is your best selection and why this is where you get the best value in flora.

About Us: Starbright Floral Design is located in the heart of New York City’s Historic Flower District.  We are located at 150 West 28th Street (between 6th and 7th Avenues in an amazing loft space – Studio 201).  We have been serving the corporate, special event and hospitality industries since 1994.

To gain a broader perspective on who we are and the work we do, we invite you to visit our website at www.starflor.com.

See you soon!

Nic and the entire Starbright Team…

June’s Birth Flower: The Rose its history and secret language decoded

The Rose of June - Brought to you by Starbright Floral Design
The Birth Flower of June

The rose, June’s birth flower is rich in symbolism and myth.  Its image has been utilized  throughout history on such diverse topics as love, war, politics and beauty.

 

The Myths

The first rose of record is said to be in ancient Greece.  The Gods had a tendency to find beauty in tragedy.  It was one of these tragic moments that created the rose.   Aphrodite, Goddess of Love, created the rose when her tears mixed with the blood of Adonis, her lover.  The Romans, not fearful of copying the Greeks like a Xerox machine, created their own legend of the rose’s creation.  According to Roman legend, there was an incredibly beautiful maiden named Rhodanthe.  She was relentlessly pursued by suitors. Exhausted by their pursuit, Rhodanthe sought refuge in the temple of Diana.  Diana was jealous of Rhodanthe and when the suitors broke down her temple gates to get near Rhodanthe, she became furious. Diana’s rage led her to turn Rhodanthe into a rose and her suitors into thorns.    The rose’s appeal was farther reaching then just the west.  The Persians had their own tale of creation.  The Persian legend explains the creation of the red rose as well as the origin of the nightingale’s beautiful voice.  According to legend all roses were originally white and nightingales were ordinary birds who can only chirp.  One day the nightingale met a beautiful white rose and fell in love.   The nightingale’s love was so intense and his need to express his love so great that he was inspired to sing for the first time.  When the nightingale made his moves on the rose and pressed himself up against it the thorns pierced his heart, coloring the rose red.  If you are like me (Greek), clearly the Greek mythological tale is more appealing.  However, fossil evidence suggests that roses existed 35 million years ago, well before any of these myths suggest.

Symbolism

The rose’s symbolic value is not exclusive to England but was most widely used and popularized there.   The rose was first looked upon as a symbol of war.  A civil war that raged on from 1455-1487 between the House of York and the House of Lancaster.   The House of York adopted a white rose, the House of Lancaster was represented by a red rose. The war has been dubbed “The War of the Roses”.  The winner of this war, Tudor Henry VII (The Tudors), merged his Lancastrian rose with the rose of his York bride and thus the creation of the Tudor Rose, the Rose of England.

In later years the rose evolved into a form of language creating a secret means of communication between lovers.   In the mid 18th century the wife of the British ambassador in Constantinople described this language in her letters.  Largely due to the publication of her letters after her death, we have the code necessary to decipher the intricate language of roses.  For example if you want to ask your love interest “will you love me?”, send an open white rose.    Want to ask  “Don’t you love me any more?” , send an open yellow rose.      Want to say “I respect and look up to you” then send a bouquet of white roses.   Red roses signify  “forever I Love You”.  However a bouquet of red and white roses state “Together we are one and united”.  Want to declare your attraction to someone but don’t want to go as far as declaring your undying love, then purple roses are the way to go.  Colors alone aren’t enough to deliver the complex messages of love.  In combination with the colors, the number and degree of bloom of the roses have also been assigned meaning.  A dozen roses says  “Be Mine”.   Thirteen roses tells someone we’ll be friends forever.  Three dozen roses expresses “I’m head over heels in love!”.  Six dozen roses or more says “my love for you is limitless”.  In addition to its Victorian assigned message, this last one says “I’m a Starbright Gold club member”.

Regardless of its diverse assigned meanings, the one constant is the rose’s undeniable beauty.  The recipient of a beautiful arrangement of roses is always appreciative.

This and most scribes on this web log is brought to you by Starbright Floral Design.  We are a full-service florist located in the heart of New York City’s Historic Flower District.  We deliver inspired floral compositions throughout Manhattan, all of New York City and everywhere beyond.  We invite you to visit our website at www.starflor.com.  Here you will be able to gain a broader perspective on our organization and on the work that we do.  You may CLICK HERE to visit our e-portal where  you may place an order for designer-inspired flower vases and arrangements, our orchids, plants and so much more.  We offer  same-day delivery to most parts of the United States.

We will be honored to be of service to you now and for a long time to come… Warm regards from all of us at Starbright, “The Official Florist of the City That  Never Sleeps”.

Flowers, Festivals and Celebrations – It is what we do!

Starbright Floral Design

150 West 28th Street – Studio 201, New York City

800.520.8999

www.starflor.com

 

Administrative Professionals Day (Secretaries Day): The law of unintended consequences strikes again.

Simple, clean and modern designs for Secretaries Week

Administrative Professionals Day (Secretaries Day) is the day executives recognize the work of secretaries, and other administrative support professionals.  However, these are precisely the people who often are given the task of organizing and keeping the executive’s schedule updated.  Every year at this time, as a by-product of the holiday, these individuals are put in an unenviable predicament.  Marking the calendar can possibly be viewed as a self-serving act.  Not marking the calendar can lead to their bosses’ embarrassment. In an effort to help our administrative professional friends and our executives, Starbright has launched an awareness campaign.  This blog as well as our other cyber communication means at our disposal are being applied to ease the burden placed on administrative professionals.

Administrative Professionals Day (Secretaries Day) is observed on the Wednesday of the last full week of April, this year the day is April 27.  National Secretaries Week was created in 1952 through the efforts of Harry F. Klemfuss, a New York publicist and honorary member of the Florist hall of fame (second part- kidding).  In 1955, the observance date of National Secretaries Week was moved to the last full week of April. The name was changed to Professional Secretaries Week in 1981, and became Administrative Professionals Week in 2000.  In the U.S. the holiday is often celebrated by taking the staff out to lunch or a gift of a beautiful floral arrangement enjoyed by all.

The secret language of flowers was created in Victorian times when etiquette was prohibitive of voicing one’s emotions.  Accordingly flowers were given hidden meanings.  Floral gifts given to administrative professionals on April 27 contain no hidden meaning.  The message is clear and for all the office to see: “Thank You!”

It is that time of the year to celebrate and express our appreciation to those who do so much all year-long to keep the wheels of commerce  moving.  Assistants of all stripes have saved companies, increased revenue, prevented recessions and even kept those that they report looking great and making sure  that personal and department performance is at it is peak.  All of us at Starbright Floral Design are standing ready all week to help you express the appreciation that is so well deserved.

Starbright Floral Design is located in the heart of New York City’s Historic Flower District in New York City and we deliver beautiful flowers, bouquets in amazing designs and so much more throughout Manhattan and beyond.

We can be reached by phone at 800.520.8999 or on the web at www.starflor.com.  Our e-commerce portal is located at www.starbrightnyc.com.  Call us, visit us, or go on-line.  We would love to meet you and have the opportunity to be of service.

Our warmest regards,

The Official Florist of the City that Never Sleeps

Starbright Floral Design – Flowers, Festivals and Celebrations.  It is what we do!