Georgia O’Keeffe and a Colorful Bouquet


Georia O'Keeffe inspired bouquet

 

Georgia O’Keeffe was inspired by what she saw in nature – over here at Starbright, we’re inspired by her perception and the images she shared.

The painting above is Ms. O’Keeffe’s Music, Pink and Blue No. 2. This abstract expression of music has an informal balance that gently flows across the canvas to create a soothing rhythm. The pattern, created by repeating circular lines and colors creates the impression of layers. Even the color harmonies mimic music.  The deep pools of concentrated color create a base (or bass!) for the sweeping mid-values to stand out against. The orange and white splashes, which are only partially visible in the above image, add focus – like lyrics, they sit slightly towards the foreground of the painting and give the eye something to pivot around.

Armed with inspiration, it’s easy to interpret O’Keeffe’s interpretation back into the natural.  The medium – flowers.

The bouquet in the above image was composed of the following flowers:

 

flowers

1/ Ranunculus : These bright orange flowers have crepe-paper thin petals. We’re reminded of the layered feel of the pattern in Music. The bright color is creating bright points of focus in these arrangements. Ranunculus come in a brilliant variety of colors. Giving a ranunculus says “I am dazzled by your charms”.

2/ Calla Lily : These undeniably elegant flowers mimic the central shape in Music. The washed pink color also reminds us of the calming shades of pink in the painting. These flowers represent abundance and beauty. 

3/ Sweet Pea : These richly colored, sweet-smelling flowers come in a variety of colors and represent blissful pleasure. The flowers themselves are about one inch big and resemble butterflies with folded wings. We chose a purple shade.

4/ Rose : This rose variety has a color gradation effect in its petals – the outer petals are light pink and get darker near the center.  According to The Language of Flowers, a pink rose represents perfect happiness. 

5/ Cornflower : These brilliant blue flowers are often called bachelor’s buttons.  The name comes from an old folk tradition that claims if worn by a young man in love the flower can divine the feelings of his beloved.  Because of this tradition, the cornflower has come to represent hope in love.  We’re going to use these in the groom’s boutonniere. 

6/ Hypericum Berries : These smooth peach colored berries add another texture to our arrangement.  We especially like how clean they look against all the ruffled petals. 

7/ Thistle : Ok, these are a little out there for the inspiration, but the rich blue/purple color and spiky prickles add great color and texture.  The thistle is also a Scottish symbol of noble character – which we think is pretty fitting for a wedding.  

The inspiration can be seen throughout the bridal parties pieces.  Below is the groom’s and groomsmen’s boutonnieres.

Georgia O'Keefe inspired Boutineers

We had a lot of fun making these colorful pieces!

Congratulations and best wishes to the happy couple!

 

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Starbright Floral Design began as a husband and wife team who had a passion for hard work and floral artistry.  Over twenty years later, we continue to stand by these founding principles. Looking for flowers in New York City? visit our Event Gallery for inspiration. Or see our daily selection at Starbrightnyc.com

 

 

Author: Starbright Floral Design of NYC

We are a team of dedicated professionals all entering as one. Starbright Floral Design is the company we are all a part of. The Official Florist sometimes is a designer, or a flower buyer, a partner, the marketing department or sometimes the guy who delivered your flowers! We invite you to visit our website and stay in touch... www.starbrightnyc.com.

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